Northampton Press

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Another View

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Let them work

The Supreme Court heard a few landmark cases for the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) community Oct. 8. Two of the cases dealt with alleged discrimination against gay employees. The third involved a transgender employee.

The first two cases involve the late Donald Zarda, an employee of a sky-diving company, and Gerald Bostock, a child welfare services coordinator, who were both terminated from their jobs allegedly after being identified as gay. Zarda made a reference regarding his sexual orientation to a client. Bostock joined a gay recreational softball league.

GUEST VIEW

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Budget blunders and the GOP

For the second consecutive year, Republicans on the Lehigh County Board of Commissioners are saying we don’t need a tax increase. But Lehigh County just borrowed $76 million. We have countless bridges still “waiting” to be fixed. We have no recovery center in a county plagued with addiction. We have employees who are underpaid and a population of seniors and children in need who are underserved.

Letter to the editor

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Farewell to a Lehigh Township landmark

To the Editor:

The demolition last month of the two-and-a-half-story Cherryville Hotel, built circa 1767, I’m sure, hardly raised an eyebrow. This was a largely forgotten piece of Lehigh Township history.

For most of its life, the Cherryville Hotel served as the social and commercial center of the township.

In the building’s final function, it housed the Betty Seidel Gift Shop (1949-2001), whose clientele included stars of stage and screen to most presidential first ladies from Grace Coolidge to Pat Nixon.

Editor’s View

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

National Fire Prevention Week

I cannot think of a better week than this to emphasize the need for volunteer firefighters in Pennsylvania — especially in the communities in which we live.

National Fire Prevention Week, celebrated this year Oct. 6-12, was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, in which more than 250 people died, some 100,000 were left homeless and more than 17,400 buildings burned.

The fire began Oct. 8 when, according to legend, Mrs. Catherine O’Leary’s cow kicked over an oil lamp. The blaze continued well into the next day.

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER WEEK: OCT. 6-12

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Local news starts with us

Newspapers have been the foundation of real news for more than 300 years. While the delivery of the product has transitioned from black ink on newsprint, to the Internet, to smartphone applications and social media outlets, no other industry is as firmly rooted in the foundation of our nation, or our communities, as the free press.

Newspapers in Pennsylvania play a vital role in your everyday life.

Interested in what is going on at city hall, school board and township meetings or the Capitol in Harrisburg?

Guest View

Wednesday, October 2, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Lehigh County commissioner opposes budget overtaxing

For the second consecutive year, Lehigh County Executive Phillips Armstrong has delivered a budget with a tax increase to the county board of commissioners.

Last year, a 4.1-percent tax increase was proposed, with the administration stating it wasn’t necessary for 2019.

This year, the administration proposed a 5.5-percent tax increase based on its five-year financial forecast, and again an increase in this amount is not necessary to fulfill the county’s responsibility to the community in 2020.

What is going on?

EDITOR’S VIEW

Wednesday, September 25, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Lunch shaming has no place in school

There is a new trend these days across the United States called lunch shaming, where unpaid lunch bills in school districts are making the news.

In July, the Wyoming Valley West School District, in Luzerne County, threatened to have children placed in foster care if their parents didn’t pay an outstanding lunch debt of $22,476.

Todd Carmichael, the CEO and co-founder of La Colombe Coffee Roasters, offered to pay the debt. The school board president refused.

Carmichael sent a letter to the district.

GUEST VIEW

Thursday, September 26, 2019 by The Press in Opinion

Vote ‘yes’ on victims’ rights guarantees

We have watched enough crime dramas to know that those accused of a crime must be given their “Miranda warnings.”

“You have the right to remain silent; whatever you say can and will be used against you in a court of law,” etc.

Critics often complain that victims and their families are accorded no similar protections, but that, of course, is an oversimplification.

Nonetheless, when you and other voters go to the polls in Pennsylvania Nov. 5, you will be asked to approve a constitutional amendment that spells out the rights of crime victims.