Northampton Press

Thursday, March 21, 2019
Press photos by Al ReckerThe former Catholic War Veterans Post 454, Washington Avenue, has a plaque on its exterior noting its history. Press photos by Al ReckerThe former Catholic War Veterans Post 454, Washington Avenue, has a plaque on its exterior noting its history.
A plaque noting the history of the former Central School in Northampton has been affixed to the brick exterior next to the main entrance on Main Street. A plaque noting the history of the former Central School in Northampton has been affixed to the brick exterior next to the main entrance on Main Street.

Northampton labels historic buildings

Wednesday, January 2, 2019 by AL RECKER Special to The Press in Local News

There has been a quiet movement throughout Northampton Borough to recognize historic structures.

Most of the buildings serve a new purpose to meet the modern world’s needs, but there are those in the borough who do not want the history forgotten.

The Northampton Area Historical Society houses memorabilia and photos chronicling the borough’s history at Siegfried Station, at West 21st and Canal streets.

The borough and Ed Pany, historian and Atlas Cement Company Memorial Museum curator, have taken the preservation of the histories attached to borough buildings to the next level. They arranged to have plaques inscribed with each building’s history affixed to the structures for future generations to embrace.

There are plaques detailing where a Civil War officer resided, the former Clyde Shirt Factory on Main Street and a factory on Newport Avenue. New plaques were just added to the former Central School on Main Street and the former Catholic War Veterans Post 454 on Washington Avenue.

The plaque at the former school details its history as a school building for various class sizes and grades. It also served as a center for immigrants and a scrap material drop-off site during World War II. It was a teenage center before being converted into apartments.

The former CWV post is now an apartment building as well. The plaque reads, “This building was home to the post office, Sons of Israel Hebrew Synagogue and Post 454 For God and Country, Catholic War Veterans.”

“This is very important,” said Pany, regarding the preservation of the borough’s history. Despite changing forms and uses, these buildings are going to be remembered for their original or historical uses.

“One accomplishment I am proud of is the new middle school halls are named after present and former cement mills, such as Atlas, Dragon, Coplay Cement, Whitehall Cement, Keystone and others,” Pany said. He reportedly also has the former Tama building on his radar.