Northampton Press

Sunday, December 10, 2017
Contributed photoA historical marker has been placed at Horner’s Cemetery, East Allen Township, for visitors to learn more about the history of Craig’s Scotch-Irish Settlement. Contributed photoA historical marker has been placed at Horner’s Cemetery, East Allen Township, for visitors to learn more about the history of Craig’s Scotch-Irish Settlement.

Horner’s Cemetery gets historical marker

Wednesday, June 14, 2017 by CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE in Local News

On Sunday, a historical marker for Horner’s Cemetery was dedicated at 4965 Nor-Bath Blvd., Route 329, between Bath and Northampton in East Allen Township.

The sign reads: “1745 Horner’s Cemetery, oldest in Northampton County, located in the center of Craig’s Scotch-Irish Settlement in Northampton Co. Interred here are the founders of Bath and Northampton, along with Allen and E. Allen Townships. The last interment was in 1946.”

The sign was in the making for a long time. It would not have been possible without the help of the Bethlehem PA Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), The Valley Forge Chapter of the S.A.R., Rogers’ Rangers and Governor Wolf Historical Society.

Why is the cemetery so important? It is among the most valuable of archaeological and historic resources in this area. It shows evidence of settlement patterns, burial practices, cultural and religious influences, economic development and social relationships and provides family genealogy.

The church and cemetery are located in the center of Craig’s Scorch-Irish Settlement, the first and longest permanent settlement between the Blue and the South mountains. Direct descendants of the Craig family visited here last year from Australia.

What would be in an old, one-acre cemetery? How about Jane Horner, the first woman killed by Indians in Northampton County? As a pre-American Revolutionary cemetery, there are 21 veterans from four wars, including three generals, seven esquires and four doctors. Dr. Matthew McHenry was the surgeon general on the ship named Provincial.

Want more? John Ralston was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and Continental Congress. Gen. Robert Brown, owner of the Friendship Tree — also called the Washington Tree — is on the list of historical trees. Mrs. Rosbrugh, wife of the church minister, who was the first cleric to die in the Revolutionary War, also is included.

How much do you know about Col. Thomas Craig? He was a descendant of the founding father. When the British Gen. Howe took over Lydia’s house, she hid in a closet. She heard Gen. Howe’s plans for a surprise attack on Gen. Washington’s troops at Whitemarsh. She got a message to Craig, who warned Washington and saved the Colonial troops.