Northampton Press

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Hamburg resident Doug Koenig poses with his 18th Bianchi Cup competitive shooting trophy. Hamburg resident Doug Koenig poses with his 18th Bianchi Cup competitive shooting trophy.
Photos courtesy of Smith & WessonDoug Koenig of Hamburg, fires off a perfect round to win his 18th Bianchi Cup competitive shooting event. Photos courtesy of Smith & WessonDoug Koenig of Hamburg, fires off a perfect round to win his 18th Bianchi Cup competitive shooting event.

Koenig does it again

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 by nick hromiak Special to the Press in Sports

Doug Koenig, former Alburtis now Hamburg resident and professional handgun shooting competitor who shoots for Team Smith & Wesson, has won another prestigious Bianchi Cup. This makes it 18 for Koenig, a title that is unprecedented in the Cup’s history that began back in 1979.

And it’s considered the first of the triple crown with the others being the IPSC U.S. Nationals and Steel Challenge.

The three-day event, held before Memorial Day, is held at the Green Valley Rifle and Pistol Club in Hallsville, MO. It draws pro handgun shooters from Australia, Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Netherlands, United Arab Emirates, Taiwan, Norway, South Africa, Philippines, Switzerland, Thailand and of course the U.S.

Koenig, now known as the winningest shooter of Bianchi. In fact, his last name in the German language means “king.” And he surely is the king of Bianchi after 18 wins. He was the first competitor to fire a perfect score back in 1990 after shooting his first Bianchi in 1987.

According to Accurate Shooter.com who covered the event, Koenig posted strong scores in all four championship events shooting a perfect score of 480-48 in the Barricade and Plates runs. Five time Bianchi Cup winner and former police officer Bruce Piatt, bested Koenig in the opening Practical event but Koenig edged out his longtime friend and rival by finishing the final event with a 1920-184 over Piatt’s 1920-181.

Bianchi consists of four stages, which makes up the match’s aggregate. Each of these stages consists of 48 rounds for a total possible score of 480 for each stage, hence resulting in a perfect score of 1920.

The four events are:

* Practical: From the set shooting line, the shooter fires at distances of from 10-50 yards under varying time limits.

* Barricade: From within shooting boxes and behind barricades a shooter fires at targets on either side of the barricade at different distances and under time limits.

* Falling Plate: From the set shooting line, the shooter fires at 8-inch round steel plates arranged in banks of six at distances of from 10-25 yards under time limits.

* Moving Target: From within shooting boxes at distances ranging from 10-25 yards, the shooter fires at a target moving from left to right with the target being exposed for only six seconds.

Shooters shoot at all these events from both standing and prone positions and are also required to shoot with both strong and weak hands at various stages. Shooters use their choice of 9mm, .38 Spl., .38 Super and .45 ACP caliber handguns.

During an interview I did some time ago, Doug said he keeps in shape like any athlete by riding bike and working out. Seems to be paying off. That, plus he practices his precise shooting skills at one of Topton F&Gs handgun ranges.