Northampton Press

Saturday, September 21, 2019
PRESS PHOTOS ELSA KERSCHNER Ken Marsh and Dave Miller of the Lehigh Township Historical Society look over a historic wagon. PRESS PHOTOS ELSA KERSCHNER Ken Marsh and Dave Miller of the Lehigh Township Historical Society look over a historic wagon.
Dave Miller donated his old Lightning,l Glider sled. Dave Miller donated his old Lightning,l Glider sled.
What is it? This donation was given with no explanation. When it is plugged in Ken Marsh said it vibrates, but he doesn't know its purpose. What is it? This donation was given with no explanation. When it is plugged in Ken Marsh said it vibrates, but he doesn't know its purpose.
A cultivator pulled by a horse and guided by a man was dug out of the mud near Long Pond. Hank Dannecker donated it to the museum. A cultivator pulled by a horse and guided by a man was dug out of the mud near Long Pond. Hank Dannecker donated it to the museum.
A crib-rocker and a high chair were originally for little kids, not their dolls. A crib-rocker and a high chair were originally for little kids, not their dolls.

Historical society has a special new wagon

Thursday, December 18, 2014 by ELSA KERSCHNER ekerschner@tnonline.com in Local News

The Lehigh Township Historical Society held its end-of-the-season open house at the museum Dec. 7.

When Dave Miller was asked what is new, he looked around and said "this wagon."

The wagon he and Ken Marsh are so proud of came indirectly from a 102-year-old woman and directly from Harold Kromer.

It was hand pulled by two people with the handle having two grips. With one pin the body can be removed and it can be lengthened to haul something such as logs.

A new case is beginning to be filled with old cameras.

A record player and a stack of records were found in the basement of St. Paul's one-room school. Dave Miller renovated the cabinet.

Marsh said he never heard of some of the groups on the records but he now knows that "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" is an old song before Tiny Tim's version. It was a windup player.

The museum received a sign with a list of veterans from Lehigh Township who died in the military. Previously it was used at Memorial Day services at the cemeteries. Marsh said more names could likely be added to the list. The names on the list run through the World Wars and Vietnam.

There are pages of information on weapons such as guns and swords, along with catalogs that originally came with big equipment.

The glass front cabinets came from a jewelry store and Betty Seidel's shop in Cherryville. The item is so large it took four guys and Keith Hantz's truck to move it.

Sarah Pagotto has been archiving materials and is the society president. She said she is finally making progress archiving, but so many donations are received that the job becomes never-ending. In the last month, 400 items came in.

A lot of it is paper such as obituaries, marriages and anniversary information. People bring in bills, statements and farm ads. They have copies of newspapers that no one remembers.

"Sometimes you discover something interesting," said Pagotto.

Remember the Campbell Kids. The museum has a salt and pepper shaker set depicting them. The burial records from St. Paul's Church can help in genealogical studies.

During the winter the museum is open by appointment by asking a society member or calling one of the numbers on the door. It will reopen again the second and fourth Sundays beginning in May, from 1 to 4 p.m.